Category Archives: Delphi

All The Worlds A Stage Theatre Tours Officially Launched + Friends Special Offer!

Dear Friends and Followers,
All The Worlds A Stage Theatre Tours went live this week!(www.alltheworldsastagetheatretours.com) It’s been a long journey over the last 18 months and your ongoing feedback and encouragement has really kept me going when it’s got tough. And as a special thank you I now have a special offer for you.

You’ll remember I was in Greece last July and was knocked out by it. Sensational theatre in Athens and the out-of town-ancient ampitheatres, the landscape, hospitality, food, music, how Greek history translates to theatre, the sun, the islands, and also the noticeable Greek resilience and devotion to pleasure and excitement.

Right now, I’m planning on going again this July to tie up some loose ends for the 2015 tour and was wondering if you (or any of your friends) might be interested in taking up this special offer:

How about joining me for 10 days or so to soak up the Mediterranean summer to test out the proposed Greek leg of the 2015 All The World’s A Stage Theatre Tour?

Here’s what you’ll get:

ACT 1 SCENE 1: ANCIENT GREECE – The Birthplace of Western Theatre
THE SETTING: ATHENS/EPIDAVROS FESTIVAL, 2014
AT A GLANCE:
10 DAYS IN GREECE including:

5 nights in Athens
5 theatre productions from the Athens/Epidaurus Festival (including the ancient ampitheatres that you’ll talk about for years!)
5 guided tours to Ancient sites:
the Acropolis (including the Theatre of Dionysis and the Odeon of Herodes Atticus); the Acropolis Museum;
Delphi and the Theatre of Apollo;
Corinth, Mycenae, Nafplio;
the Ancient Theatre at Epidavros,
the Asclepeios Healing Sanctuary and the Little Theatre of Ancient Epidavros.
2 nights of seaside indulgence in rural Epidavros
3 nights of Odyssean intrigue on the Island of Ithaca

+ my knowledge + my 2013 experience (all documented on this blog – brendaaddie.com)
+ you could also check out the proposed 2015 Greek leg of the tour on www.alltheworldsastagetheatretours.com
OR
http://www.alltheworldsastagetheatretours.com/where-we-go/ancient-greece/

As this business is in its infancy, I’d just be asking you to join me at cost – we’d do a land only price and you get yourself to Athens.

There are still some good flights avail but filling fast. Obviously if we were to get 10 people together we’d get some significant reductions.

AND I get to travel with people I like as my case studies, What fun!

Send me an email ‘tell me more!’ to brendaaddie@gmail.com
We’d need to book in the next 10 days! (or use the contact form below…)

With best wishes for front row seats always,
Brenda.

P.S. Please pass this on to anyone you think might be interested.

Day 4 The Theatre of Apollo at Delphi

SEE THE WORLD AND SEE WORLD THEATRE

THE THEATRE OF APOLLO AT DELPHI
Today I utilized the knowledge and experience of a conducted tour, and as I had already seen the main Festival offering, Ibsen’s, An Enemy of the People, at the 2012 Melbourne International Arts Festival, I opted for a leisurely Greek taverna dinner with an Athenian friend in the evening.

The exceedingly well organized tour was headed by an exceptional guide who cheerfully imparted her wealth of historical, mythological and topical material. Leaving Athens, the bus took a 2 hr drive through its urban sprawl, fertile plains and seaports, into the dizzying heights of the mountains. Amongst the urban sprawl was the location of Marathon, the plains of Thebes, the Sanctuary of Olympia, the site of The Muses, and the Temple to Demeter, which is of great interest to me as it is the Temple associated with the Mysteries School.

In terms of Greek Theatre, David Wiles has devoted a good deal of scholarship to the notion of the significance of place. Indeed this was an element I engaged in my own Masters thesis in as much as a playwright will make reference to a place and by association, the audience will appreciate the deep meaning. Although associations of place had already been aroused in me, in view of actually passing through the places encountered in ancient literature, it is an area I would like to explore in my future studies of Greek drama texts.

The Temple of Apollo is located on Mount Parnassus. The extraordinary rugged beauty of the place in high summer belies its existence as a winter playground for cross country skiing and snowboarding and other snow activities I know nothing about!

Arriving at the Temple of Apollo, and passing through the agora, one is seemingly greeted by the imposing columns of the altar at the entrance to the temple, and at which, supposed sacrifices took place prior to performances in the theatre.
Theatre, according to one source, http://www.coastal.edu/ashes2art/delphi2/sanctuary/theatre.html, was a sacred act with the priest of the temple officiating. Actors were also sacred and highly revered, and from my observations, this attitude seems to persist amongst modern Greeks.
The ampitheatre, which seats 5000, is well preserved and overlooks the The Temple. As the patron of Delfi, Apollo is the god of light, music, poetry, healing, prophecy and more, and is the twin brother of Artemis, goddess of hunting.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo, gives an excellent account of Apollo’s duties as the Patron of Delphi/Delfi and also makes clear the positioning of Delphi as the navel of the world. Indeed the ancient ompholos is represented by a concrete replica on site with the supposed original ? or at least, another replica housed in the site museum.
Our guide explained that the site is exceptionally high in magnetic energy, which in turn, is associated with prophecy. I watched as a tourist carefully placed his hands on the concrete ompholos and I hope he was blessed with a suitable Delphic response.

When I asked the guide about contemporary use of the theatre, she informed me that several years ago, Vanessa Redgrave had performed Phaedre here. Wow! (even though it’s unsubstantiated.)

The visit to this site has revealed just how much more I want to learn about Ancient Greece. It is very inspirational. For my next trip, I intend to have expanded my knowledge and to have obtained a passable amount of basic Greek. For the most part, people working in museums and tourist places speak English, but everyone responds very well when you greet them with kalimera and acknowledge them with efpharisto.

Dinner in a back street taverna near Monastiraki was wonderful. Angela Makris ordered a wide range of local delicacies ranging from deep fried feta with honey and oregano, local salad, meatballs, and I can’t remember what else. Although I do remember the ouzo. I really enjoy the freshness and relative simplicity of Greek food and the taste of tomatoes and other salad vegetables is very different from Australian salad vegetables. Maybe Greek soil is magic!

Walking through the main streets of Athens at night was without incident and at no time have I felt unsafe.